I'm using git-svn and I accidentally typed 'git svn rebase' on my feature branch, what are the ramifications?

I’m using gitsvn and I accidentally typed git svn rebase on my feature branch, what are the ramifications?

Normally I type git svn rebase on master, then I’ll type git rebase master feature to update the feature branch. Is it safe to checkout master, do a git svn rebase and skip the second step? I’m hoping that will be equivalent to what I normally do.

I’m afraid I’ll cause issues once I merge --ff-only from feature back into master and dcommit master.

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  • 2 Solutions collect form web for “I'm using git-svn and I accidentally typed 'git svn rebase' on my feature branch, what are the ramifications?”

    You can use your reflog (git log -g) to go back to where you were on the feature branch before the accidental git svn rebase. The git svn fetch component of the original command is fine so there’s no need to git svn reset that. You can just go to your master branch and do the git svn rebase as usual to clean things up.

    As you say, there may not be any issue at all since you planed to do a rebase of that feature branch anyway.

    I use a git svn repository mapped to a single svn branch. I did the same lately and I had no problems. I even did a dcommit directly from the feature git branch. In any case, you can always show the commits locally before dcommiting to make sure every thing is fine prior to further actions.

    Git Baby is a git and github fan, let's start git clone.