git svn clone has been running for a very long time. Is there a way to prove it's not stuck in an infinite loop?

I ran git svn clone about 24 hours ago and it’s still running without an end in sight. When I ls the destination directory, there’s nothing in there but a .git folder. Is there a way to prove that this command is actually making progress and not stuck in an infinite loop?

I’m running this command on windows 7 with cygwin.

The part that concerns me the most is I keep seeing messages like this over and over again:

W: Refspec glob conflict (ref: refs/remotes/trunk@8286):
expected path: branches/trunk@8286
    real path: OLD/branches/APP
Continuing ahead with OLD/branches/APP
W: Refspec glob conflict (ref: refs/remotes/trunk@8287):
expected path: branches/trunk@8287
    real path: OLD/branches/APP
Continuing ahead with OLD/branches/APP
W: Refspec glob conflict (ref: refs/remotes/tags/1.1@8289):
expected path: tags/1.1@8289
    real path: OLD/trunk/APP
Continuing ahead with OLD/trunk/APP
W: Refspec glob conflict (ref: refs/remotes/tags/1.1@8289):
expected path: tags/1.1@8289
    real path: OLD/trunk/APP
Continuing ahead with OLD/trunk/APP
W: Refspec glob conflict (ref: refs/remotes/tags/1.1@8289):

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  • One Solution collect form web for “git svn clone has been running for a very long time. Is there a way to prove it's not stuck in an infinite loop?”

    There is actually no way to do this. There is a proof in computer science about how it is not actually possible to tell if a program is in an infinite loop or not. This proof is known as the Halting problem. Here is a link:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halting_problem

    It sound to me like you are downloading something huge. Do you know the size? If the git repo has tons of images (read 10,000+) and you have a slow connect then the time to clone does not seem unexpected. If your git repo is only a few Megs, then it sounds like you have a problem, but in that case the remote server would most likely not be returning that stream of errors. Does that make sense? What else do you know about this problem?

    Git Baby is a git and github fan, let's start git clone.