git: How do I get the latest version of my code?

I’m using Git 1.7.4.1. I want to get the latest version of my code from the repository, but I’m getting errors …

$ git pull
….
M   selenium/ant/build.properties
….
M   selenium/scripts/linux/get_latest_updates.sh
M   selenium/scripts/windows/start-selenium.bat
Pull is not possible because you have unmerged files.
Please, fix them up in the work tree, and then use 'git add/rm <file>' as appropriate to mark resolution, or use 'git commit -a'.

I’ve deleted the local copies of the files the tool is complaining about, but I still get the errors. How do I check out the latest version from the remote repo? – Dave

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  • 8 Solutions collect form web for “git: How do I get the latest version of my code?”

    If you don’t care about any local changes (including untracked or generated files or subrepositories which just happen to be here) and just want a copy from the repo:

    git reset --hard HEAD
    git clean -xffd
    git pull
    

    Again, this will nuke any changes you’ve made locally so use carefully. Think about rm -Rf when doing this.

    Case 1: Don’t care about local changes

    • Solution 1: Get the latest code and reset the code

      git fetch origin
      git reset --hard origin/[tag/branch/commit-id usually: master]
      
    • Solution 2: Delete the folder and clone again 😀

      rm -rf [project_folder]
      git clone [remote_repo]
      

    Case 2: Care about local changes

    • Solution 1: no conflicts with new-online version

      git fetch origin
      git status
      

      will report something like:

      Your branch is behind 'origin/master' by 1 commit, and can be fast-forwarded.
      

      Then get the latest version

      git pull
      
    • Solution 2: conflicts with new-online version

      git fetch origin
      git status
      

      will report something like:

      error: Your local changes to the following files would be overwritten by merge:
          file_name
      Please, commit your changes or stash them before you can merge.
      Aborting
      

      Commit your local changes

      git add .
      git commit -m ‘Commit msg’
      

      Try to get the changes (will fail)

      git pull
      

      will report something like:

      Pull is not possible because you have unmerged files.
      Please, fix them up in the work tree, and then use 'git add/rm <file>'
      as appropriate to mark resolution, or use 'git commit -a'.
      

      Open the conflict file and fix the conflict. Then:

      git add .
      git commit -m ‘Fix conflicts’
      git pull
      

      will report something like:

      Already up-to-date.
      

    More info:
    How do I use 'git reset –hard HEAD' to revert to a previous commit?

    I suspect that what’s happened may be that you’ve deleted the files that you modified (because you didn’t care about those changes) and now git is taking the deletion to be a change.

    Here is an approach that moves your changes out of your working copy and into the “stash” (retrievable should it actually turn out that you ever need them again), so you can then pull the latest changes down from the upstream.

    git stash  
    git pull
    

    If you ever want to retrieve your files (potential conflicts with upstream changes and all), run a git stash apply to stick those changes on top of your code. That way, you have an “undo” approach.

    You have to merge your files first. Do a git status to see what are the files that need to be merged (means you need to resolve the conflicts first). Once this is done, do git add file_merged and do your pull again.

    If you just want to throw away everything in your working folder (eg the results of a failed or aborted merge) and revert to a clean previous commit, do a git reset --hard.

    I understand you want to trash your local changes and pull down what’s on your remote?

    If all else fails, and if you’re (quite understandably) scared of “reset”, the simplest thing is just to clone origin into a new directory and trash your old one.

    By Running this command you’ll get the most recent tag that usually is the version of your project:

    git describe --abbrev=0 --tags
    

    It sounds to me like you’re having core.autocrlf-problems. core.autocrlf=true can give problems like the ones you describe on Windows if CRLF newlines were checked into the repository. Try disabling core.autocrlf for the repository, and perform a hard-reset.

    Git Baby is a git and github fan, let's start git clone.